Texas Guardsmen and Texas Task Force 1 rescue personnel wade through thigh-deep water to help stranded residents back to rescue vehicles during severe flooding in Wharton, Texas, April 21, 2016. In coordination with Texas Task Force 1 and the City of Wharton emergency services, a detachment from Delta Company of the 536th Brigade Support Battalion, Texas Army National Guard deployed several Light Multi-terrain Vehicles to floodwaters rescuing both people and pets. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by 1st Lt Zachary West) ((Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by 1st Lt Zachary West/Wikimedia Commons))
Texas Guardsmen and Texas Task Force 1 rescue personnel wade through thigh-deep water to help stranded residents back to rescue vehicles during severe flooding in Wharton, Texas, April 21, 2016. In coordination with Texas Task Force 1 and the City of Wharton emergency services, a detachment from Delta Company of the 536th Brigade Support Battalion, Texas Army National Guard deployed several Light Multi-terrain Vehicles to floodwaters rescuing both people and pets. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by 1st Lt Zachary West)

(Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by 1st Lt Zachary West/Wikimedia Commons)

Tropical Storm Imelda destroys the Texas Gulf Coast

September 26, 2019

Tropical Storm Imelda barreled through the Texas Gulf Coast on Sept. 19 claiming five lives. Many Texans have compared this storm to Hurricane Harvey, which hit Houston in 2017, while others are saying this storm is way worse. 

“What I’m sitting in right now makes Harvey look like a little thunderstorm,” said Sheriff Brian Hawthorne.

Thousands of residents evacuated into local shelters, the airports were closed and schools were also closed as a safety precaution. Many areas of Texas had extreme flooding in turn submerging cars and ruining houses. 

“Imelda soaked the region with as much as three feet of rain. The National Weather Service declared a flash flood emergency for parts of five counties in the southeastern area of the state, calling it a “PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS SITUATION” and urging residents to “SEEK HIGHER GROUND NOW!”

Fire rescue and emergency crews have been rescuing people from their flooded homes and bringing them to safety. They have been using dump trucks and boats to reach the residents, their first priority being those with medical needs and the elderly. 

Casey Rodriguez (’21) said, “I am truly devastated by the disaster that has occurred but I am truly grateful Texas stood prepared and had such a wonderful team of pipe to help keep Texans out of harms way.”

Gabby Butler (’20) has family who lives in Texas. While they were not personally affected by the floods, they have friends who live in Houston who were affected. “They said that their cars got flooded and water started to slowly leak into their house. They could not leave their house for a while and were stranded,” said Butler.

The American Red Cross has set up several temporary shelters across Texas. Academy girls can help the people of Texas by donating to the Greater Houston Community FoundationSoutheast Texas Food Bank. People can also send donations like clothes, shoes and nonperishable items, through the American Red Cross. 

 

 

 

 

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