This year, the Iowa Caucus fell just after the Super Bowl, just before the State of the Union Address, and during the impeachment of President Donald Trump. (Photo Credit: Mei Lamison/Achona Online/Piktochart)
This year, the Iowa Caucus fell just after the Super Bowl, just before the State of the Union Address, and during the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

Photo Credit: Mei Lamison/Achona Online/Piktochart

Technological Setbacks Delay 2020 Iowa Caucus Results

February 4, 2020

On Feb 3, 2020, all eyes were on Iowa as the first caucuses of the Democratic Presidential Primaries took place. The attention, however, was met with chaos and confusion as results were delayed into Tuesday, Feb 4. 

“It’s a mess and because it’s a mess, people are starting to lose trust in the system,” says history teacher Beth Chase. 

This year, in an attempt to avoid inaccuracy, the Iowa Democratic Party had precincts report caucus results through a mobile app. However, Troy Price, chairman of the party, stated last night delays were a result of the app’s “coding issues.” Iowa officials have stressed problems do not stem from hacking. 

In addition to the app, the Iowa Democratic Party set a series of new rules for the caucuses, increasing confusion among precincts and participants. 

Early Tuesday morning, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, offered to test the app for the, but Iowa leaders declined.

The same app is set to be used for the Feb 22 caucuses in Nevada.

Initially, officials from Iowa struggled to explain the setback. According to The Washington Post, “the party would not say why it was not releasing any information, and struggled to explain what issues had caused the considerable delay.” 

As of noon today, the Iowa Democratic Party has promised 50% of the results by no later than 5 p.m. According to the Washington Post, official staff have been sent to collect paper ballots from precincts in person. 

Among the top polling Democratic candidates, Senator Bernie Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Elizabeth Warren, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Senator Amy Klobuchar, Andrew Yang, and Tom Steyer launched competitive campaigns in the state. 

Despite the delays, many of the presidential hopefuls addressed their supporters late Monday and into early Tuesday. Most of them thanked their crowds for their support and then shifted the topic of discussion towards future primaries. 

Biden’s campaign, however, released a letter to the Iowa Democratic Party leadership “requesting full explanations for the failures before any official results are released.” 

Mayor Pete, on the other hand, claimed victory for himself. 

The chaos and confusion provided an opportunity for many to speculate the credibility of the entire process. 

Brad Parscale, Trump’s reelection campaign manager, suggested the caucus was “rigged.” He wrote, “Democrats are stewing in a caucus mess of their own creation with the sloppiest train wreck in history.” 

Criticisms came from both sides of the political spectrum. Democratic Representative Ilhan Omar tweeted Tuesday, suggesting the app’s developer was tied to Buttigieg’s campaign. Following the tweet, “Mayor Cheat” was trending on twitter. 

The Washington Post reports additional campaigns paid for services from the app’s company, including Biden and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand who dropped out of the race in August. 

“With the extreme feelings surrounding this upcoming election, the stakes are too high to mess anything up. When it comes to a political process like a caucus, in short, it has to be perfect. Now is the time to make sure all of your ‘t’s are crossed and ‘i’s are dotted,” said United States history teacher Lori Kearney. 

As of 2 p.m. results have still not been released. Currently, it seems the candidates have moved on from last night results. Most of them have already left for New Hampshire where the next primary is set to take place. 

“People only really pay attention to the Iowa caucuses because they are the first ones,” said Chase. “Also, Iowa doesn’t reflect the makeup of the entire country, the population their is 90% white,” 

To put the situation in perspective, there are 41 delegates candidates can gain in the state. Candidates’ must earn at least 1,991 delegates to win the presidential nomination. 

UPDATE 4:58 p.m.

Live on CNN, Price stated he had no knowledge of the Department of Homeland Security’s offer. 62% of the precincts have been reported. He did not comment on the remaining data nor did he provide a time frame for when they will be released. 

62% of Iowa Democratic Caucus Results: 

Buttigieg: 26.9%

Sanders: 25.1%

Warren: 18.3%

Biden: 15.6%

Klobuchar: 12.6%

Yang: 1.1%

Steyer: 0.3%

Popular vote: 

Sanders: 28,220

Buttigieg: 27,030

Warren: 22,254

Biden: 14,176

Klobuchar: 13,358

Yang: 1,124

Styer: 222

UPDATE 1:51 P.M. 

71% of Iowa precincts are now reporting, but no winner has been declared. Sanders and Buttigieg are fighting for first.

71% of Iowa Democratic Caucus Results: 

Buttigieg: 26.8%

Sanders: 25.2%

Warren: 18.4%

Biden: 15.4%

Klobuchar: 12.6%

Yang: 1%

Steyer: 0.3%

Popular vote: 

Sanders: 32,772

Buttigieg: 31,458

Warren: 25,816

Biden: 16,545

Klobuchar: 15,598

Yang: 1,301

Styer: 275

UPDATE 2:32 P.M. 

75% of Iowa precincts are now reporting, but no winner has been declared. Sanders and Buttigieg are fighting for first.

75% of Iowa Democratic Caucus Results: 

Buttigieg: 26.9%

Sanders: 25.2%

Warren: 18.2%

Biden: 15.6%

Klobuchar: 12.5%

Yang: 1%

Steyer: 0.3%

Uncommitted: 0.2%

Popular vote: 

Sanders: 34,136

Buttigieg: 33,094

Warren: 26,613

Biden: 17,623

Klobuchar: 16,116

Yang: 1,409

Uncommitted: 1,119

Styer: 285

UPDATE 9:05 P.M. 

92% of Iowa precincts are now reporting.

92% of Iowa Democratic Caucus Results: 

Buttigieg: 26.5%

Sanders: 25.6%

Warren: 18.3%

Biden: 15.9%

Klobuchar: 12.1%

Yang: 1%

Steyer: 0.3%

Uncommitted: 0.2%

Popular vote: 

Sanders: 42,027

Buttigieg: 40,823

Warren: 32,788

Biden: 22,073

Klobuchar: 19,429

Yang: 1,722

Uncommitted: 1,399

Styer: 371

UPDATE: Feb 7, 7:05 A.M. 

99.94% of Iowa precincts are now reporting, however Iowa Democratic Party Officials have still not announced the official winner. Sanders and Buttigieg are separated by 0.01% in the race for first. 

On Thursday, Feb 6, DNC Chairman Tom Perez called for an immediate “recanvass” of Iowa. Many others in the state are calling for a recount.

99.94% of Iowa Democratic Caucus Results: 

Buttigieg: 26.2%

Sanders: 26.1%

Warren: 18.0%

Biden: 15.8%

Klobuchar: 12.3%

Yang: 1%

Steyer: 0.3%

Uncommitted: 0.2%

Popular vote: 

Sanders: 45,826

Buttigieg: 43,195

Warren: 34,771

Biden: 23,691

Klobuchar: 21,181

Yang: 1,780

Uncommitted: 1,418

Styer: 413

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